1. Companion Planting

    Companion Planting

    (Source: visual.ly)

     
  2. Companion planting chart

    Companion planting chart

    (Source: visual.ly)

     
  3. 11 Awesome speakers at PermacultureVoices PV1

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    in March 2014, I had a chance to go to the permaculture voices (PV1) conference in Temecula CA.  This is my list of amazing speakers that blew me away.  I’ll give a brief overview of what I saw and my impressions of the speakers.

    When the videos of PV1 are available, I’d highly recommend watching any of these presenters presentations.

    Stand Out, Super Awesome, Best presenters/presentations:

    #1) Elaine Ingham - Building Soil Health

    She did a 3 Hour talk (!), which I missed(!) due to a few other speakers that I wanted to check out. I did have the chance to see her speak for an hour.

    In that hour, Elaine had 110% of my attention (the 10% was my day dreaming about soil biology). She had a lot of pictures to go along with her talk. I had no idea how crucial good fungal growth is to the health of soil. (1+:1 fungus to bacteria is the sweet spot. i.e. 100:1 is a old growth forest, 0.1:1 can only support weeds)

    #2) Willie Smits - Village based Permaculture. This was incredible. If you aren’t familiar with Willie Smits (I sure wasn’t, Go watch this.), This talk was basically about the incredible technology and planning his group throws at the devastated lands in Indonesia. Recipes! Sugar Palms!

    #3)  John Todd - Restoring the waters

    John had an awesome presentation of how his company cleans up damaged waterways. They install plant and fungal systems to clean waste water from black water to oil spill damage. 

    #4) Joel Salatin - Stacking Fiefdoms

    Joel… Well, he is Joel If you haven’t seen him speak before, pop open youtube and start clicking through some of his videos. Most of his keynotes were business focused. This one had some key phrases that stuck with me: “Assume abundance” when looking at anything (land, business options, etc.). This is where the fiefdom’s come in. At Polyface,  and probably just about anywhere, there are easy ways to carve out a place for yourself as long as you keep your eyes and mind open to the opportunities.

    #5) Adam Klauss - Bio-Dynamic Farming

    Adam and his wive Alison run Bella Family farm in Western Colorado. Adam’s talk explained some of the science behind bio-dynamic farming. I missed his talk about the Brown Swiss cows he uses, and why he loves them. 

    #6) Mark Shepard - Ally Cropping and Silvopasture.

    Mark has a great saying he throws around: S.T.U.N (Sheer Total Utter Neglect). As in his farm management style. 

    #7) Paul Greive - Using social media to generate farm revenue

    Primal Pastures is his family farm that uses various technologies to promote and he had a great presentation sharing a bit about what how and why he uses what he does. Coming from a technology background, his choices are excellent from a usability(They are all simple to get good results) and  standpoint, 

    #8) Rob & Michelle Avis - Starting a permaculture based business

    Rob’s presentation dealt with the business aspects of running a design business.  He talked a bit about bringing your “description” of you or your business down to a few simple sentences. And make it so a sixth grader can easily understand. 

    #9) Jack Spirko - Building a profitable Permaculture business

    I’m not familiar with Jack’s podcast, I’ve listened to maybe half of one, but he really seems to know business.  His talk mentioned the Elevator pitch (explain your business in two sentences) and that when starting a business, get a CPA and tax lawyer involved(unless you are one, then just get the other). Great talk, very dense in information, I can’t wait to listen to this one again.

    #10) Greg Judy - Multi species Grazing

    Greg is from “my neck of the woods”. He farms over 1400 acres in north central Missouri. And… Not much of it is actually his, it’s leased to him, sometimes for free.

    This talk was on multi species grazing(Cattle, Sheep, Pigs, etc.). Greg spoke about different breads he likes and his livestock dog preference. He also went in to the business side of leasing land from out of towners.  Make them happy and make them part owner in the herd. Who doesn’t want to be a “rancher”? 

    #11) Javan Bernakevitch -  Finding your Niche

    "Don’t be busy" i.e. outsource the stuff you can’t, don’t want to, do. Javan had a ton of great information on narrowing down things to find your niche. Namely, find what you Enjoy, are Good at, and find Enriching. Once found, Do it.

    This is another talk that was so dense, I really need to see his presentation again to really “get it”.

    That’s it. There were a ton of incredible speakers that I missed. When the videos are released I’ll try to catch up on the ones I missed. Diego has also pulled together some excellent podcasts related to the content at permaculture voices.

    Related Articles from other folks:

    From Al at carterpermaculture: https://carterpermaculture.wordpress.com/2014/03/30/big-changes-with-little-risk/

     
  4. Brewing Beer

    I’ve gotten a little side tracked this year. I had a plan of 3 hobbies that I was going to focus on, and I have put some attention toward 2 of the 3. But… Another one snuck up on me and has dominated my thoughts. Brewing Beer… 

    I’ve been interested in brewing for a few years and tried it once in the past. This year I decided to severally limit the beer I purchase (Only bars, and other special occasions. i.e. birthdays, bottling days, etc.) in favor of brewing my own beer.

    A couple reasons I decided to do this. I want the knowledge and I want to make something. 

    So far, it’s been going really well. The couple beers that I brewed weren’t perfect by any stretch, but they were drinkable and simple to make. That’s a win. My goal is to get my cost for a 5 gallon batch under $15 by saving yeast, growing my own hops, bulk purchases of other ingredients, possibly malting my own barley. This would take my cost per beer(12oz.) under 30 cents. To further illustrate this point, an incredible craft brew at half the cost of PBR from my local gas station. 

    Resources:

    Video:

    One of my favorite aids, a coworker mentioned to me, is a video series put out by Northern Brewer called Brewing TV.  There are around 73 episodes of Brewing TV and they talk about making beer, cider, wine, and mead; ranging in complexity from grinding your own grains to boiling some extracted malt. They also visit a number of small craft breweries around the US. The series has sort of fizzled out in 2013 as the main cast(Michael Dawson and Jake Keeler) and crew have moved on from Northern Brewer.

    The crew I mentioned is cameraman and editor Chip Walton has gone on to create his own website and youtube show called Chop and Brew. This show is more or less a continuation of Brewing TV with a little more Chip and less of the Dawson and Keeler folk. 

    image

    Books:

    I bought a few books when I had initially started brewing, it was nice to have them available when I picked up the hobby a few years later.

    Home Beermaking - The Complete Beginner’s Guidebook  - William Moore - This is a great place to start. It’s a small book, around 70 pages, and it’s super easy for anyone to digest in a night. Or you could read it on a saturday morning, get all your equipment by noon, and have a couple batches fermenting by 5pm.

    The Complete Joy of Home Brewing - Charlie Papazian - If you were to only buy one book. This is pretty well the only one you need.

    The Complete Handbook of Home Brewing - Dave Miller - This was the first brewing book I purchased around ‘00 at a little brew supply shop near my house. Unfortunately, I didn’t get into brewing back then, It would have saved a lot of money with all the beer we drank at that house :)

    Audio:

    Brewing Network - BN radio - I’ve only listened to a couple of these podcasts. They will probably remind you of the morning show of your local rock radio station. Give them a listen to see if they are something you like. I’d highly recommend the episode where they interview Sandor Katz

    Closing:

    I hope find this to be useful information if you know of someone that may be interested in getting started brewing, pass this along.

    My brew log can be found on my personal website: 2matoes

     
  5. Companion planting operates on the basic premise that certain plants play nicer together than others.  Some plants function to bring out the flavor of another, deter unwanted insects, attract wanted insects, and compliment the soil.

    On the flip side, some plants cause other plants nothing but root-ache and grief, so you want to avoid planting them near one another.  If you are interested in gardening organically, companion planting is a great way to work with mother nature.

    Here’s a basic companion planting guide to get you started as you plant the layout of your garden this year

    (Source: onehundreddollarsamonth.com)

     
  6. (via Medium Tool Roll 17x15 by slowdownsew on Etsy)
     
  7. 06:21

    Reblogged from backyardharvest

    biodiverseed:

decodeencode:

A Guide to SeedSaving, SeedStewardship & Seed Sovereignty (PDF) by The Seed Ambassadors Project (2010).
From the front page …

If SEED SAVING is collecting seeds for replanting in the future…
Then SEED STEWARDSHIP is the process of saving seeds with the purpose of maintaining or improving that seed’s health and resilience. It also includes the act of saving and selecting a variety over a period of many seasons, with the end goal of passing it on to others in the future.
The ideal of SEED SOVEREIGNTY firmly plants seed saving and seed stewardship in the realm of fundamental human rights. It is the freedom to save seed and determine the foundation on which our food system rests. With the current attacks of industry hitting at the heart of food sovereignty, the simple act of seed saving becomes a major act of resistance and social empowerment.

Contents …
Why Save Seeds
Fundamental Concepts
Seed Saving Tools
Easy Seed
Tomatoes (the gateway drug)
Beans & Peas
Corn
Cucumbers, Melons, & Squash
Herbs: Annual & Biennial
Lettuce
Peppers, Eggplant & friends
Spinach & Miscellaneous Greens
Less Easy Seed
Biennial Roots: Beets, Chard, Carrots,
Onions, Leeks, Parsnips
Brassicas: Broccoli, Kale, Cabbage,
Turnips, Brussels Sprouts, Kohlrabi
Guide to Jargon
Read More

BiodiverSeed.com/tagged/books
BiodiverSeed.com/tagged/resources

    biodiverseed:

    decodeencode:

    A Guide to SeedSaving, SeedStewardship & Seed Sovereignty (PDF) by The Seed Ambassadors Project (2010).

    From the front page …

    If SEED SAVING is collecting seeds for replanting in the future…

    Then SEED STEWARDSHIP is the process of saving seeds with the purpose of maintaining or improving that seed’s health and resilience. It also includes the act of saving and selecting a variety over a period of many seasons, with the end goal of passing it on to others in the future.

    The ideal of SEED SOVEREIGNTY firmly plants seed saving and seed stewardship in the realm of fundamental human rights. It is the freedom to save seed and determine the foundation on which our food system rests. With the current attacks of industry hitting at the heart of food sovereignty, the simple act of seed saving becomes a major act of resistance and social empowerment.

    Contents …

    • Why Save Seeds
    • Fundamental Concepts
    • Seed Saving Tools
    • Easy Seed
    • Tomatoes (the gateway drug)
    • Beans & Peas
    • Corn
    • Cucumbers, Melons, & Squash
    • Herbs: Annual & Biennial
    • Lettuce
    • Peppers, Eggplant & friends
    • Spinach & Miscellaneous Greens
    • Less Easy Seed
    • Biennial Roots: Beets, Chard, Carrots,
    • Onions, Leeks, Parsnips
    • Brassicas: Broccoli, Kale, Cabbage,
    • Turnips, Brussels Sprouts, Kohlrabi
    • Guide to Jargon
    • Read More

    BiodiverSeed.com/tagged/books

    BiodiverSeed.com/tagged/resources

     
  8. 11:36 9th Feb 2014

    Reblogged from barrettorama

    Tags: video

     
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