• Interviewed a couple guys from the Farm at Kraut Run

    tumblr_ngash81qWc1rtf9o6o1_500

    Interviewed a couple guys from the #krautrunfarm today. For an upcoming podcast series #slowdownpodcast http://ift.tt/1G8zfgM




    Hay!




    The Lost Art of Sharpening | crosscuts and castirons

    The Lost Art of Sharpening | crosscuts and castirons




    cheesenotes:

    Loving this Salami Microbiology poster that you can download from MicrobialFoods.org:

    Ever wonder what makes your salami fuzzy, crusty, and tart? Our Visual Guide to Salami Microbiology provides an overview of everything you need to know about microbes in and on your favorite artisan salami. Print it out. Hang it up.  Marvel at the microbiological wonders growing on your salami! Download our Visual Guide to Salame Microbiology here.




    Why – Slow Down Farm

    I recently went to a workshop put on by Rohan Anderson/Whole Larder Love. It was hosted at Camp Wandawega in Wisconsin. The idea of the workshop, put simply, was to get yourself closer to where your food comes from.
    Camp Wandawega was serene, so the lulls between workshop bits gave me time to really think and nail down the “Why” Slow Down Farm exists. Deep down I knew… Just wasn’t really able to put it into words before now. 
    Here are those words:

    Slow Down

    One thing I’ve been practicing for a couple years I like to call ‘Wandering meditation”.
    Observe. Look around. Smell the soil. Touch the leaves(not the poison ivy). 
    Take some time out to tend the garden. Check out the worms.  Tickle the piglets noses through the fence (watch your fingers, they are a similar texture to carrots). 
    One thing with having a job in the Tech industry, There is no slow. The Slow Down Farm was created to Get myself away from this industry and into a place where I can have time to take in the simple pleasures of life.

    Help other people eat good food.

    Eating good food is awesome. I love sitting down with friends to put things in our mouths. Be it wine, beer or food; it always turns out better when we make these things by hand. (Also, I hear everything tastes better when using the metric system. This is something I must test out.)
    Sure I eat something crappy, now and then, thinking it’s easier or faster than making something good. 
    Generally that is false. If I do a few minutes of prep at an earlier point I can make something great and at less of a financial cost.
    The Slow Down Farm was created to get me closer to the people I care about and food that I take care in preparing and eating with those people.
    Make a good, ethical, living.
    Making things is a lot of fun. What was the last thing you made by hand? (I made some salsa last night!)
    In trying to make some of the things I would normally buy; I’ve found an interest in sewing, harvesting animals, curing meats, and making food that is canned, bottled, or fermented. 
    Most of all, growing plants and animals. This is the part I’ve only dabbled in, but there are trees in the ground and garden beds being set for the coming seasons. The animals are only a wish at this point.
    The Slow down farm was created as a way to focus on making a good, ethical, living instead of going to “work”.
    So, I guess that’s the Slow Down Farm manifesto; I hope it helps you find what you’re after too.



    Whole Larder Love: PRACTICULTURE




    How I reduced my cell phone bill by 88%

    My monthly phone service bill is actually $0 for 200 minutes, 500 texts, and 500MB of data. The 88% is actually for another service I pay for ($4/month) to have 500MB mobile data for my tablet… so it’s a bonus bit of mobile data.

    Here is how I did it:

    I’m frugal and I don’t use my phone for more than texting and maybe a call or two a week. Easily under 100 minutes per month.  12 cents per minute or text is too high.

    If you only use a few minutes but do a fair bit of texting, keep reading; if not, have a look around at the rest of slowdownfarm.com. Seriously. Don’t waste your time if you talk on the phone a lot.

    (more…)




    joshpasholk:

    newtowngarden:

    mothernaturenetwork:

    How big a backyard would you need to live off the land?

    Graphic illustrates how much backyard square footage would be needed to feed a family of 4 a well-rounded diet of meat, dairy, eggs, wheat, fruits and veggies for a year. Not surprisingly, it’s a lot.

    This is a great infographic you need only 1.5 acres. So cool.

    Great homesteading infographic.




    Farm update

    Headed out to the farm on Sunday armed with 150 trees and a hoedag(there will be a detailed post about this tool later). Needed to check up on the land too.

    Planted 75 of smooth/aromatic sumac and wild plum(25 of each). I still have 75 of black cherry, pecan and rose mallow. They will be planted next weekend.

    Most of the willows planted last year are alive. They are still quite small.

    The pond looked okay. It is certainly building an ecosystem; I noticed frogs, dragonflies, and my dog enjoyed it to. There is some crazy screaming frog in there. It startled me a few times. It was like “AAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHH”, I’d jump and look toward the noise, then see it swim smoothly away. (Maybe it was a croak… but I distinctly remember more of a scream).

    The swales were dry, but the soil around them was moist.




    Companion Planting